Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – A Detailed Comparison

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Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

As a beginner, getting a bass guitar for yourself can be quite the chore, especially because you might not know what exactly you need. Well, that’s why you have us. We’ve gone through a host of bass guitars that we feel would be really great choices for you and we’ve come up with two for you to choose from. Today, we have Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304.

The Ibanez SR300 is a series containing a few guitars, all of which we would discuss, while the Yamaha TRBX304 is a single guitar. Because the SR300 is a series, all the guitars in it are very similar, which is why we would be discussing them all together.

With that preamble, we’re sure you already know that this would be quite a lengthy read. If you do not have the time or patience to read through the whole article, here’s a brief overview that contains all the necessary details in the article. However, if you do have the time, we advise that you read through the whole article as it promises to be fun and informative.


Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Comparison Overview

The first thing we are going to look at in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 debate are the similarities between these two products.

Both of these guitars come in a double cutaway design. The double cutaway design helps to reduce the weight of the guitar, which is great for beginners, because of the extra comfort. Apart from reducing the weight, the cutaway design helps you reach the lower frets.

Another similarity is that both of these guitars are available in 4 strings. 4-string bass guitars are great for beginner for various reasons, all of which are expounded upon in the article. Both of these guitars are also available in 5-string versions. However, only the Ibanez is available in 6-string versions.

Moving away from the similarities, we went into the crux of the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 matter, the differences. The fingerboards are different, the tonewood (body wood) used in making the two bass guitars are also different, and they have different fretboard radius widths.

For their cost to performance ratio, both these guitars belong to the same price range and offer similar qualities, which are good qualities. Because of that, we would have to say that price to performance ratio is top-notch for both these guitars.


Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Brand Comparative Advantage

The first guitar is made by Ibanez, while the second is made by Yamaha. Both of these brands are considered really top guitar-making brands. They are both Japanese companies who have been in existence since the 1990s.

Ibanez focuses on creating guitars, while Yamaha is more widespread, making a wide range of musical instruments. If you want to get a guitar simply because of the brand name, you can get either of these guitars are both brands are well respected.

However, there is one aspect where Yamaha absolutely stomps Ibanez. Yamaha offers you a lifetime warranty on all of its products. Please check with company for terms and conditions.


Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Comparison Table / Spec Sheet

  Ibanez SR300 Yamaha TRBX304
Body construction Double cutaway Double cutaway
Fingerboard / fretboard Rosewood (except SR300M that has a maple fretboard) Mahogany
Number of frets 24 24
Number of strings 4 strings (5 and 6-string models also available) 4 strings (5 string model also available)
Fingerboard radius 12 inches 10 inches
Tonewood (body wood) Agathis Mahogany
Neck type 5-piece bolt-on neck 5-piece bolt-on neck
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – What Situation Is Each Better For?

So, our first port of call with regards to the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 argument is to look at what situation what guitar is better for. The first thing you have to know about these guitars is that they are both good guitars. However, one is better for certain scenarios and situations, while the other is better for another scenario or situation. Without further ado, let’s jump right in:

Ibanez SR300 Yamaha TRBX304
The whole SR300 series is a really good stepping stone if you’re new to bass guitars. If you want to start off with something that’s affordable but still offers quality and comfort, then you want something off of the SR300 series. This guitar is also regarded as an entry-level guitar. Just like the name implies, entry-level guitars refer to guitars that have been made for beginners. This will reflect in the price of the guitars, the build quality, the comfort it provides, and mainly, ease of use.
The first reason why you want this is because of the brand. Ibanez is a well-respected brand in the industry and as such would not want to tamper with their reputation by making bad guitars. All the guitars in the SR300 series come with the basic features that Ibanez guitars come with, as well as, the same mark of quality. Just like the Ibanez guitar, this guitar is made by a well-known and respected brand, all over the world. Yamaha is regarded as the biggest piano making company in the whole world, and certainly one of the biggest instrument-making companies as well.
In fact, because the SR300 is made of such quality, this is a guitar that you would probably be using well into your intermediate level of playing. Still speaking about the brand, Yamaha offers a lifetime warranty that includes change of parts and repairs, just to show you how much quality means to them.
Finally, if you’re a lefty, you’re in luck. Because of how small the left-handed community is, they often get left-out in builds like this (pun intended, lol).   But this guitar comes with a left-handed version. So, you don’t have to switch orientations because you want to learn bass. Stick to the left and still get great quality. Sorry if you’re a lefty, but this guitar does not come in a left-handed version. You could check out other guitars we’ve talked about in the past.   Surely, you should find some that are available in left-handed versions. Or you could simply look left from where you are now *wink*.
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – What Features Do They Have In Common?

Although the main focus for today is Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304, we would still like to look at some features that they both share. Just like we would do physical opponents, we’ll need to check what these two do similarly, then what they do differently, before we can find the true winner.

However, even in the similarities, there might still lie certain degrees of implementation. Do trust us to point out these degrees. So, even if you’re here solely for the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 battle, do not miss this part as the knockout punch to determine the winner might even lie within.


Body Construction: Double Cutaway Design

The body construction of any guitar is often overlooked. Most people think that all the body construction adds to are the looks of the guitar, that is false. Although the construction doesn’t affect the sound so much as an acoustic guitar, it does affect some other parts.

With a double cutaway design, these guitars are made to be more lightweight. The traditional bass guitar is quite heavy, because of the thickness and hardness of the wood used in making them. However, when you “cutaway” certain excess parts of that guitar, what you’re left with is a bass guitar that still looks good, but is lighter.

When you look at some of the woods used in making these guitars, like the Mahogany used to make the Yamaha, you appreciate the weight dropped because of the double cutaway design.

Apart from the weight, the double cutaway design helps you to hit those lower frets without stress. Without a cutaway design, it becomes very difficult to play frets beyond the 20th fret because of the bends your hand would have to go over.

However, with the cutaway design, the places your hand would have had to maneuver to get to the frets are cut-off. This means that your hands get to the lower frets easy and you can play those high-notes. This is especially important if you get the 4-string bass because they don’t contain those higher notes on another string like the 5 and 6-string versions.


Number Of Frets: 24

Both of these guitars are double cutaway designs, both of these guitars come with 24 frets. These 24 frets give you a long range of notes to play with, which is always a good thing.

While we think that this is a good thing, not everyone does. Some people are of the opinion that as a beginner, 24 frets might be too forward a move. The argument is that if you learn with 24 frets, it’ll be difficult to play a bass guitar that has lesser frets.

The actually make a solid argument, and although we do not agree with them, we had to point it out. We think that the first thing shouldn’t be number of frets, but discipline. As a beginner, if you can discipline yourself to learning the basics of the bas guitar, of any bass guitar, you would be able to play with any number of frets.

Bolt-on Necks

Another feature that both of these guitars have in common is bolt-on necks. If you do not know what these are, and you do not know how and why they matter, here’s a number of reasons why bolt-on necks are good:

First, they provide your guitar with stability. Ignore the name for a bit, these necks are screwed unto your guitar by screwing, as opposed to bolting. Because they are screwed and not bolted (seriously, why didn’t they just name these screwed-on necks for world peace?) these necks last really long without them damaging.

And if they damage? Well, if these go get damaged, they’re still great because they’re easier to replace than other neck types. All you have to do is unscrew the damaged one, get a new one, and screw that one in place. One downside with the Yamaha guitar, though, you would have to order a replacement from them directly, or take the guitar to them for repairs.

The next thing that makes this guitar good is the attack that these necks provide. Attack in terms of music, yes. They produce a brilliant and sharp sound. Although, through necks are the better option when it comes to enhancing the tone of your guitar, bolt-on necks are not afar off.

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Number Of Strings 4 (Available In 5)

The basic form of any bass guitar is with 4 strings. This is the direct electrical variation of the standing bass, otherwise known as the cello. This is why you see all, or almost all, beginner-level bass guitars come with 4 strings.

With these two guitars, we see the same thing. However, both Ibanez and Yamaha went a step forward with these two guitars by provided their 5 string variations. Ibanez took theirs two steps forward as the SR300 series has a 5-string version, and also a 6-string version.

If you’re a beginner, we suggest that you get the 4-string version of any of these two for yourself, and here’s why:

Why Should Beginners Use A 4-String Bass?

The first reason is one which we’ve mentioned briefly, earlier. The 4-string bass is the most basic form of a bass guitar. When learning anything, best practice is to learn the basics, and then work your way up from there. If you learn the basics, you will be well-grounded, grounded enough to learn the variations and complex versions of said thing.

If you start learning with a 6-string or 5-string bass, chances are high that you wouldn’t know how to play a 4-string bass, when given the opportunity.

Also for beginners, the second reason you should pick the 4-string is because of comfort. The more strings are added to a bass guitar, the heavier the wood has to be, which means the heavier the bass had to be. If the bass is to heavy for you as a beginner, you wouldn’t be able to withstand the pain and practice for long hours, which is needed.

Added to that, for every extra string added, the neck width of the guitar is considerably wider. Since you’re just starting with the bass guitar, it’s better you start with something that’s comfortable for you. That way, you’re not easily discouraged through your learning process. With bass guitars, your fingers have to stretch to reach the thicker strings, from their resting position. With 4-string bass, this stretch is significantly smaller than say, a 6-string bass.

Now, away from beginners, this final benefit of the 4-string bass is for people who are at any learning stage. Once you’ve passed your beginning stage, you should now pick the number of strings you want in your guitar based on the style of music you want to play.

Different number of strings on a guitar produce different sounds and are beneficial for certain kinds of music than others.

Downside Of Using A 4-string bass

Well, the only downside of using a 4-string bass is that it has 5 less notes than the 5-string bass. With every string added, there are five more notes for you to play with. Depending on the type of music you play, this can turn out to be very important.

To solve this problem, both Ibanez and Yamaha decided to make a 5-string version of these guitars. So, best practice would be to pick up the 4-string version as a beginner, then work your way up the strings as you get better and better.

Here’s a video that explains the things you need to take into consideration before picking a number of strings for your guitar.


Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – What’s Unique To Each Product?

Features Unique To The Ibanez SR300

Fingerboard: Rosewood

All, except one of the guitars in the Ibanez SR300 series come with a rosewood fretboard. When it comes to fingerboards/fretboards, rosewood is most time the go-to wood, and this is for a good number of reasons.

The first reason is that rosewood is very hardwood. Of the most commonly used tonewoods, rosewood has the highest hardness, measured in pounds. As a bassist, the fretboard is the one place that you would always have to interact with, which means that you should take the material used in making that part of your bass, really seriously.

Because of how hard and dense rosewood is, you can rest assured of the durability that this fretboard will provide. When compared to other tonewoods like maple and mahogany, rosewood produces a pretty warm and mellow sound. For a bass guitar, for most people, this is what they’re looking for.

However, this is one point in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 that is judged purely on preference. So, if you prefer a much darker, mellower, warmer, sound, you want a rosewood fretboard. Otherwise, you can check out for maple or mahogany that produce brighter, sharper sounds.

Rosewood is a naturally oily wood, which means that it does not require a finish. This is both good and slightly bad news. The bad news is that without a finish, you would have to condition your fretboard yourself, from time to time. However, it’s not such bad news as this is not a difficult task. You can easily do this alongside your regular string change.

The good new is that without a finish, this fretboard has a really natural and smooth feel. You don’t have to worried about any chemicals getting under your skin, this is pure, fresh, wood.


Tonewood (Body Wood): Agathis

Probably one outright blow that the Yamaha gives these guitars in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 argument, the tonewood of the SR300 series is not great. In fact, we’re being mild, compared to some of the things people out there say about Agathis, not very people like it, and they’re not wrong for doing so.

On the scale of tonewoods, Agathis lies bottom-placed with the likes of basswood. It cannot compare with mahogany, alder, and let us not even mention rosewood. You can even see in the guitars that you find Agathis in. You cannot find Agathis in a really pricey guitar. You will only see it in a budget guitar like the SR300 series, and it’s mostly used by Ibanez, we don’t know why.

Although, if we were to compare the tones and sounds produced by this tonewood, it can be likened, in some way, to mahogany. While their qualities cannot be compared, the sounds they produce are quite similar.

Okay, okay, let’s look on the bright side. There is a small silver-lining in this. This is the fact that this is an electric guitar. Because it’s an electric guitar, the tonewood doesn’t really affect the sound as much as it does in an acoustic guitar. Therefore, you can have this guitar sounding similar to one that has mahogany by adjusting your electronics accordingly.

So, while this might look like a big deal from afar, on close contact, you’ll find that it actually doesn’t make much of a difference. You can tell by the number of people who picked up the SR300 and enjoyed the sound it produced off of their amplifiers.

Neck Radius: 12 Inches

The SR300 comes with a 12-inch neck radius. This is for their 4-string guitars. Obviously, with more strings would come extra neck radius. With that established, a 12-inch radius is 2 more than the Yamaha guitar that has a 10-inch radius.

Well, that has to be another point for Yamaha in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 argument. If you read through the part where we talked about strings (scroll up if you didn’t), then you would understand what we mean.

But just to paraphrase, for a beginner, a slimmer neck is better. This is to provide you with maximum comfort which will make your learning phase a more enjoyable one. Because your fingers are just started on the bass, you want to give them a shorter distance to stretch, and then work your way up from there once that begins to feel comfortable.

Although 12 inches is not so wider than 10 inches, we have to point out that the Yamaha would provide that slightly extra comfort, in this regard.


The Types Of This Guitar Available

Just like we mentioned earlier in this article, the SR300 is a series that features different guitars. In this section, we would be highlighting the various types guitars available in this series, and their slight variations from the SR300, which is the base model for this series

SR300M

The first variation in this series is the SR300M. The SR300M is almost identical to the SR300. The only difference between these two guitars is that the SR300M comes with a maple fretboard, while the SR300 comes with a rosewood fretboard.

Picking between these two is down to your preference and the type of music you want to play. Rosewood produces a really warm, dark, full sound and tone. On the other hand, maple produces a striking, bright sound.

So, if you play a style of music that requires a striking sound, you that the 300M, if you play a style that requires a more mellow sound, you take the 300. If you want something in the middle, you get a guitar with Mahogany fretboard, like the Yamaha TRBX304.

Now, there are some people who feel that whatever fretboard you pick doesn’t matter, as it doesn’t affect the sound, we disagree and we have proof. Check out the video below to find out that truly, the difference between maple and rosewood fretboards is not just color:

SR300DX

Just like you would’ve guessed by now, the additional letters at the end of the series name are usually acronyms. The “m” in the former one referred to “maple”, as you would’ve guessed. The “dx” in this means “deluxe”. Does that mean the better version? Let’s find out.

The only difference, or rather, the most notable difference between this and the SR300 are the electronics. The DX version comes with split and single-coil dynamic pickups. From feedback, these pickups sound amazing.

The sound from this guitar is better than the sound from the 300, because of these pickups. These pickups give your guitar the versatility that you need. Want to play some metal? It’s great for those. Want to go mellow with some R&B? Does that well too. To go from metal to warm, all it takes is the turn of a knob.

SR300EB

Still about the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 argument, here is another guitar in the SR300 series. Now, all of these guitars were not released at the same time. The DX version we talked about earlier was released before the SR300 version, which in turn was released before this version.

Basically, what this version is, is an overall upgrade to the SR300, in terms of quality. The first thing we see, is that with this version, you have a Mahogany body as opposed to an Agathis body, like the rest in the series.  Coupled with that improvement is the improvement to the electronics in this guitar.

The major thing you should take note of with respect to improvement is the Mahogany body. To find out just how good mahogany is as a tonewood, scroll down to read the unique features of the Yamaha TRBX304. That is because that guitar comes with a Mahogany body.

This guitar in the series comes in a left-handed version, if you’re a lefty.

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

SR300EBB

This is pretty much the same as the SR300EB the only difference being the “B”, which refers to the color. While the SR300EB comes with chrome colored hardware, the SR300EBB comes with black hardware.

There is another slight difference, though. The SR300EBB is only available in a 4-string version, and a 5-string model. There is no 6-string model for this version.

And those are all the different types of guitars in the SR300 series. Which do you prefer the most? Which one do you feel is most suited to the kind of sound and the kind of music you want to play?

Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here

Click here to get the SR300M now

Click here to get the SR300DX now

Click here to get the SR300EB now

Click here to get the SR300EBB now

At the end of the day, picking a guitar depends on the sound. If the sound does not resonate with you, you’re not getting the bass, no matter what we say. So, here’s a video of the Ibanez SR300 demo:


Features Unique To The Yamaha TRBX304

Fingerboard: Mahogany

In the argument of Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304, we would have to give this one to the Ibanez SR300 series. While this uses a Mahogany fretboard/fingerboard, the Ibanez uses rosewood. Before looking at what mahogany brings to the table, we can all agree that rosewood is a better tonewood than mahogany.

Although, that is not to rule out mahogany completely from the equation as it does possess certain attributes that the rosewood does not. Mahogany produces a very resonant tone and has a really nice sustain. People who play with mahogany tonewood claim that it has a pretty balanced overall tone.

To put that in perspective, maple produces really bright, striking sounds. On the other end of the spectrum, rosewood produces really warm and mellow sounds. The middle of that spectrum is where Mahogany lies, in between bright and warm. As a tonewood, it doesn’t only emphasize on bass, but also treble notes, producing an overall tone coloration.

For the feel, Mahogany features some of the thinnest finishes you can find. This makes it feel as natural as possible, without having to condition it over and over like rosewood. So, although rosewood has better quality, we can say that mahogany is not afar off.

Tonewood (Body Wood): Mahogany

The tonewood of this guitar is also made with Mahogany. So, it has all the features we listed earlier that the fingerboard has, in terms of sound, tone coloration, and feeling.

However, when we directly compare this body wood with that of the Ibanez, we would have to go ahead and give two points to Yamaha in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304. If you haven’t read what we said about the body wood of the Ibanez, you should scroll up and check it out.

Compared to Agathis, mahogany is a way better tonewood. In fact, people look at Agathis and describe it as the cheap, low-budget version of mahogany. This is because Agathis resembles Mahogany in terms of sound and tone produced.

However, you cannot compare the quality and hardness of mahogany to that of Agathis. Ultimately, what this means is that the Yamaha is going to be a lot more durable than the Ibanez series. If you have slippery hands and drop your guitar often, this is something you should be considering heavily.

Fretboard Radius: 10 Inches

The final difference between the two guitars in the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 argument is the difference in their neck radii. This guitar has a neck radius of 10 inches, which is pretty slim.

A slim neck radius is good for a beginner as it provides you comfort. In your early days as a bass guitarist, you would face some challenges. These challenges can either be reduced or heightened, depending on what type of gear you get and are using to learn.

The challenge of stretching your fingers to hit the thicker strings is reduced with a slimmer neck. This is also one of the reasons why a beginner is advised to use a 4-string bass as opposed to 5 or 6-string bass. That being said, this neck radius refers to the 4-string variation of this bass guitar. Obviously, the more strings you add, the wider the neck becomes, the more neck radius it has.

Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Unique Pros

Ibanez SR300

  • This is a series, which means that you have a variety of options to choose from.
  • It’s available in left-handed versions, which is great for left-handed players.
  • Rosewood fingerboard is considered to be of greater quality than Mahogany.

Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here

Yamaha TRBX304

  • The tonewood of this guitar is Mahogany, which is of superior quality to Agathis.
  • This guitar has a slimmer neck than the Ibanez, which creates comfort for the beginner-bassist.

Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Unique Cons

Ibanez SR300

  • The tonewood is made of inferior, Agathis, material.

Yamaha TRBX304

  • It doesn’t come in a left-handed version.
  • It is a single guitar, not a series. Therefore, no options available.

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Common Pros

  Ibanez SR300 Yamaha TRBX304
Brand Both of these brands are considered really big, and not obscure in any explanation of the word.   Because of this, you can depend on the brand to deliver quality, as they’ve been doing for years. Yamaha is probably the most known instrument-making brand in the world, certainly the biggest piano makers.   Also, Yamaha gives a slightly higher advantage with their lifetime warranty.
Double cutaway design This guitar comes with a double cutaway design.   This design makes the guitar lighter and also makes it easier for you to reach the lower frets with ease. This guitar also comes with a double cutaway design, and carries the same added advantage as the Ibanez.
4-string base model, 5 string variation Both of these guitars have a 4-string base model, as well as a 5-string variation from that.   However, the SR300 series goes a step further by providing a 6-string variation, while the Yamaha stops at 5 strings. This guitar also has a 4-string and a 5-string option. This works well for both beginners and intermediate players.   However, it is not available in a 6-string variation.
  Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Common Cons

The Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 guitars do not have any common con. To find out the cons that happens to both of these guitars, scroll up to check out their unique cons.

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – General Feeling Customers

Ibanez SR300 Yamaha TRBX304
This guitar was well appreciated in the market place. There were a lot of reviews, a lot of comments, and most of them were positive.   This doesn’t come as a surprise to us, looking at the price that this series was set at and the quality it brings at that price point.   Not all smiles, though, a lot of people weren’t at peace with the Agathis body. A lot of people didn’t like it and weren’t very comfortable with its durability. This guitar was also appreciated in the market and was received with a lot of warm comments.   The first reason being the brand. A lot of people have grown accustomed to Yamaha and have even been drawn into Yamaha’s ecosystem of musical instruments.   The price of this guitar and the quality it provided at said price, was also a huge factor as to why this did so well in the market.   However, the left-handed bass community was not able to use this, which brought upon them, a feeling of neglect.
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here   Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 – Final Thoughts

We’ve finally gotten to the end of the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 debate. If we were to give our verdict, at first, we would’ve said Ibanez SR300. That’s because of its versatility and the various options available to choose from, especially the left-handed version.

However, because the SR300 is a series, as opposed to the Yamaha TRBX304, we would say that the Ibanez SR300 Vs Yamaha TRBX304 was not a fair comparison in the first place. But because of how well one Yamaha guitar stood up against a whole series, we would have to give the crown to Yamaha for this one.

After all is said and done, the ball lies in your court:

Ibanez SR300 Yamaha TRBX304
Click here to get the Ibanez SR300 here  

Click here to get the SR300M now

Click here to get the SR300DX now

Click here to get the SR300EB now  
Click here to get the SR300EBB now  
Click here to get the Yamaha TRBX304 here

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